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The file is ready to insert into my template and print. It's the right size, the right resolution (300dpi) and has 3mm "bleed". Bleed is the extra bit of colour or photo that needs to go beyond the trim line so we are cutting through the colour.
All digital files are either BITMAP and VECTOR.
BITMAP is made up of little boxes - ideal for photos, gradients, blending such as shadows. (jpg, TIFF, png, gif, PhotoShop)
VECTOR is made from equations - so that circles are made from a line, not boxes. Vector can be enlarged or shrunk to any size without degradation. Logos and text should be vector. (eps, ai)
DPI is Dots per Square Inch. Most digital camera can take very very large photos at 72dpi - the original resolution of old PC monitors. Macs were always at 96dpi.. Today phones and iPads can be up to 180dpi.
But PRINT needs a minimum of 300dpi. I like to have your raw photo and I use PhotoShop to adjust the size of the photo and the resolution at that same time. The engine in PhotoShop extrapolates what colour should be where. If you reduce the photo to the correct size at 72dpi - it will always be a low resolution photo unfit for print.
My test - blow a photo up to 300% on your computer screen. What you see is what the naked eye will see in print. It is looks bad on your computer screen at 300%, it will look bad in print.
Roughly, a good photo for a brochure should be 1 to 5MB.
GSM ( Grams per Square Metre) is an international standard of paper weight. Your everyday paper (bond) is 80gsm. Letterheads can go up to 120gsm. Brochures can be between 130 to 170gsm.
170gsm is the dividing weight between paper and card stock. 170gsm and higher paper folds need to be "scored" - the fibres of the paper need to be mashed on the fold line so the folds don't crinkle.In-house, we lightly score 150gsm brochures for a perfect fold with less cracking of the ink.
In other countries, business cards can be on 220gsm and up. But Australian like heavy cards. It became a trend to have 420gsm cards (boards) that are so thick they don't it in your wallet. Luckily, these are becoming out of fashion. 300gsm is a good weight. I have one recycled stock that comes in 350gsm.
GSM (Grams per Square Metre) is an international standard of paper weight. Your everyday paper (bond) is 80gsm. Letterheads can go up to 120gsm. Brochures can be between 130 to 170gsm.
170gsm is the dividing weight between paper and card stock. 170gsm and higher paper folds need to be "scored" - the fibres of the paper need to be mashed on the fold line so the folds don't crinkle.In-house, we lightly score 150gsm brochures for a perfect fold with less cracking of the ink.
In other countries, business cards can be on 220gsm and up. But Australian like heavy cards. It became a trend to have 420gsm cards (boards) that are so thick they don't it in your wallet. Luckily, these are becoming out of fashion. 300gsm is a good weight. I have one recycled stock that comes in 350gsm.

GSM is the most common published differenciation between paper, but there is also opascity, smoothness, bulk and other things professionals look at for quality. I have 230gsm that feels like 300gsm, and 350gsm that is so soft it feels much lighter.

Celloglazing can be matt or gloss and is a very thin plastic coating (35 to 45 microns) that strengthens and protects your card stock, ie, business cards or book covers.
It was originally developed for photographers and I've been told, it will neither yellow nor crack my family photos.We trim celloglaze with the paper. With laminating, you trim it beyond the paper so that the paper is encased. Celloglazing is not environmental, but there are some things, like photos and books, that you want to last at least 100 years.

The Cursed Celloglazed Curl - when celloglaze is put on one side, it can cause the card stock to curl as moisture is absorbed on the plain paper side. Book covers can ONLY be celloglazed on one side so the glue on the cover can adhere to pages. Hence, celloglazed book covers tend to curl over time.

Gloss is fake paper. Oh, there is a piece of paper somewhere in the middle, smoothered in a chemical composition.Plain paper always feels more bulky, thicker compared with gloss with the same gsm. Ok, I concede, colours can be more vibrant on gloss.The operative word is "can" be, depending upon the skill of the graphic artist.
My local paint shop has sample books from a paint company on plain paper. These manufacturers sell colour - PAINT colour. They used a plain paper that didn't make their paint colours POP. Maybe it seemed more real. It wasn't vibrant like a shiny, glossy magazine. It's real.
Gloss is cheaper - because everyone wants gloss because it's cheaper - and the spiral goes downwards. The cost of paper has a direct correlation to the amount of paper they manuafacture.
But a brochrue on 150gsm recycled uncoated stock FEELS better. That's not my words - my clients use that same word over and over.. The paper is bulkier, the colours are richer, deeper. And your brochure printed on 150gsm recycled becomes a tactile as well as visual experience. It can be more memorable.
OK - if someone asks for gloss, I do have some recycled gloss in stock. HiBulk gloss (gloss business cards) is not recycled, but my HiBulk is guaranteed plantation and TOTALLY chlorine free (TCF). It's the best I can do for you and for mother earth.
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